How to Look at Hills

Posted on Updated on

“…the hill isn’t in the way, it is the way.”

What a wonderful way of looking at climbing. Read more at cyclistthings.com. The author says:

My sister-in-law Christy taming Iron Point! 

Thinking about the mountain’s relentless grade that wants to pull you back down with every pedal stroke towards the top can be discouraging for most but after some time is put into the saddle something changes. Suddenly you find yourself adding that extra few miles to hit a climb or turning back downhill just to hit a section of the climb that you particularly enjoy. 

That moment shift in mentality marks the beginning. The beginning of a time when you actively want to go out and ride these taxing rides that most people wouldn’t dream of. Once you realize that the hill isn’t in the way of your destination but the way you want to go, then you might progress from an average rider to one that will make your cycling buddies groan because you’re taking them up ANOTHER climb.

The way I put this sentiment was: just pedal. Whatever the road brings you, just pedal and you will prevail. Just pedal, because that’s why you’re out there.

Love,
Your Bear

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “How to Look at Hills

    […] Climbing. If you need, take short breathers BEFORE or AFTER the hills. Avoid stopping mid-climb. It is dangerous to yourself or others to stop on a steep hill. It can be difficult to take off up hill. Your body is probably not getting a really good rest, since you’re thinking about the climb. That being said, if you do have to stop, do it on the least-steep part of the hill, and do it in the shade. […]

    […] Climb like a Champ: I know you want to stop on those climbs, but you are really better off pedaling. So, analyze NOW what is most intimidating for you on a climb. Is it simply a fear? Is it muscular cramps? Pain in other parts of your body? Do you think your heart rate is too high? — If it is this last, then please see your doctor immediately. Otherwise, practice, bike fit, or nutrition and hydration are the likely culprits. And remember: be one with the hill. […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s